Sourdough Bialys

17 Oct

Main1    This recipe is adapted from the book “Inside the Jewish Bakery” by Stanley Ginsberg and Norman Berg.  The original recipe is a straight dough made with yeast and I changed it up to use a white sourdough starter.

Bialys are mainly a New York kind of thing, and if you have never had one you owe it to yourself to bake some and you will never look back.

Most of the breads I bake need to rest 1 to 2 hours before eating, but with these you can feel free to slather on some butter or cream cheese when they just come out of the oven.

I am able to buy these from the local bagel stores on Long Island and I’m happy to say my version is just as good if not better using the SD starter.

Closeup1

Sourdough Bialys (%)

Sourdough Bialys (weights)

Download BreadStorm .bun file here.

 

Levain Directions

Step 1

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my proofer set at 83 degrees and it took about 4 hours.

Onion Poppy Seed Filling

45 grams Dehydrated Onions

340 grams Boiling Water

14 grams Vegetable Oil

10 grams Black Poppy Seeds

4 grams (1/4 tsp.) Sea Salt

Add the boiling water to the onions and stir and let them sit for around 30 minutes or longer.  Next strain them out and spread them on a piece of paper towel.  Wring out as much water as you can.

Mix the onions with the remaining ingredients and refrigerate until ready to use.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours with the ice water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the starter and  salt and mix on low for 5 minutes and speed #2 for another 3 minutes.   You should end up with a cohesive dough that is slightly tacky but very manageable.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  Let the dough rise until it is doubled in size.  I used my proofer and it took around 5 hours.  (Note: I did not make a fresh starter but used part of my mother starter I had refreshed a few days before which is why it probably took so long.)

When the dough is ready, divide into 12 pieces that are 85 grams each and shape them into round rolls shapes.  Let them rest on a parchment covered baking sheet and cover with sprayed plastic wrap or a moist lint free towel(s).  Let the shaped dough proof until they are doubled in size and the poke test leaves a nice indent.  You almost want them to over-proof otherwise they will puff up too much which you don’t want.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 500 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Once they are proofed sufficiently take each ball in your hand and place your two thumbs in the middle and stretch the dough so the center is paper thin and the outside has a nice thick rim.  It’s almost like making a mini pizza.

Shaped

ShapedClose

Next, place a teaspoon of the onion filling in the middle of each shaped bialy and place in your oven.   Place the cup of boiling water into the oven and bake for 15-20 minutes until the bialys are nice and brown.

Crumb

This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

Durum Tangzhong Sourdough

13 Oct

Main I was in the mood for a nice Durum loaf and figured I would use the Tangzhong method to lighten it up a bit.  I’ve used this method for rolls several times but not on an actual loaf.

I have to say this simple recipe turned out amazing with a nice thin crust and moist and open crumb.  This is one of those breads you can just eat with some butter or cheese or olive oil and call it a day.

I highly recommend you give this one a try.  It makes great toast, grilled bread and sandwiches or goes well with some “Italian Gravy”!

Last week was our Lexie’s first birthday and Max’s second so we celebrated on Friday with a doggie cake.  Both puppies loved their cake :).

DoggieCake

DoggiesEatingCake

Closuep1

Durum Tangzhong Sourdough (%)

Durum Tangzhong Sourdough (weights)

Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

Closeup2

Tangzhong is the technique of heating a portion of the flour and liquid in your recipe to approximately 65C to make a paste (roux).  At this temperature the flour undergoes a change and gelatinizes.  By adding this roux to your final dough it will help create a soft, fluffy, moist open crumb.  It is also supposed to help prevent the bread from going stale.

It is not very difficult to do a Tangzhong.  Use a  5 to 1 liquid to solid ratio (so 250g liquid to 50g flour) and mix it together in a pan.  Heat the pan while stirring constantly.  Initially it will remain a liquid, but as you approach 65C it will undergo a change and thicken to an almost pudding like consistency.  Take it off the heat and let it cool before using it in your recipe.  Some people will refrigerate it for a while but you can use it right away as soon as it cools.

Levain Directions Build 1 (Using AP Starter at 66% Hydration for Seed)

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my Proofer set at 81 degrees and it took about 4 hours.

Main Dough Directions
Prepare the Tangzhong per directions above and allow to cool to room temperature.

Mix the flours, Tangzhong and water together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 20-30 minutes.  Next add the salt, oil and starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), and  mix on low for a minute.   Mix for a total of 6 minutes in your mixer starting on low-speed and switching to speed #2 for the last 2 minutes.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (If you have a proofer you can set it to 78 degrees and only leave the dough out for 1 hour to 1.5 hours before placing in the refrigerator).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desire and cover with a moist lint free towel or sprayed plastic wrap.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.  Note: I used my proofer set to 80 degrees and it took a little over an hour to be ready.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35 minutes until the crust is nice and brown.

Let them cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

Crumb

This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

Cherry Walnut Porridge Rolls

9 Oct

MainThese may not be the prettiest rolls I have baked but they sure are chock full of nuts and cherries and super moist from the porridge as well.

Crumb

I really used too many nuts and should have scaled it back a bit since it made it very difficult to shape the rolls with so many nuts and cherries.  The walnuts really had an interesting effect on the color of the dough turning it a muted purple contrasting with the red cherries.

I used dried cherries since fresh ones are not available at this time of the year.

These really came out quite tasty despite the garish appearance and would be great for the holidays.

Note: Organic Six Grain Flakes from King Arthur Flour contain Oats, Barley, Wheat, Rye, Kamut and Rice.

Closuep

Cherry Walnut Porridge Rolls (%)

Cherry Walnut Porridge Rolls (weights)

Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

Levain Directions (Using AP Starter at 66% Hydration for Seed)

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.

Oat Porridge Directions

Add about 3/4’s of the water called for in the porridge to the dry ingredients in a small pot set to low and stir constantly until all the water is absorbed.  Add the remainder of the water and keep stirring until you have a nice creamy and soft porridge.  Remove from the heat and let it come to room temperature before adding to the dough.  I put mine in the refrigerator and let it cool quicker.

 

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours   and the water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the levain, cooled porridge and salt and mix on low for 5 minutes.  Add the walnuts and cherries and mix for a minute or so until they are both fully incorporated.   You should end up with a cohesive dough that is slightly tacky but manageable.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).  Note: this is a pretty wet dough so you may need to do a couple of additional stretch and folds.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5.  Remove the dough and shape into rolls.  Since the dough is fairly wet you will need some bench flour to aid in shaping the rolls.

The dough will take around 1  hour to rise depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it’s size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

I did not use an egg wash this time but if you want some shine on your rolls apply it before placing the rolls in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

Immediately lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for around 35 minutes until the rolls are baked through.

Take the rolls out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

CrumbCloseup

This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

Red Lentil Sourdough Bread

30 Sep

MainI’m always on the lookout for something new and different when I visit specialty markets.  The other day I found some red lentils at the market and figured it would be worth trying them in a bread.

Lentils

I happen to love lentil soup so I figured the nutty flavor of the lentils would go good with some spelt and freshly ground whole wheat.  I used some of my KAF European style flour as well and added some walnut oil to add a little more nutty flavor.

The lentils were cooked with water until nice and soft.  I didn’t drain any of the cooking liquid so I’m not sure exactly how much water was absorbed.  Next time I will do it a little more scientifically and figure out the actual water content added to the dough.  I made way too many lentils as well so I will have to scale back next time as most of them are still in my refrigerator.

The dough mixed up nice and was very wet but manageable.

The final bread came out excellent with a little more tighter crumb than expected but a great thick crust with a moist nutty tasty crumb.  This one will be worth trying again for sure.  It toasts well and makes a good sandwich or dipping bread for my wife’s lasagna with homemade sauce, meatballs, sausage and lots of cheese.

Closeup2

Lentil Bread (%)

Lentil Bread (weights)

Download BreadStorm .BUN file here.

Closeup1

Levain Directions

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours and lentils with the main dough water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the levain, walnut oil and salt and mix on low for 6 minutes.   You should end up with a cohesive dough that is slightly tacky but  manageable.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.  (Note: I left the dough in my refrigerator for over 24 hours and it really expanded more than I usually get so I only let it sit out for around 45 minutes before shaping).

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it’s size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Dolphin

Dolphin and Elephant (Ears)

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.   Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 210 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

Crumb

CrumbCloseup

ElephantEar

This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

Buttermilk Tangzhong 00 Durum Rolls

16 Sep

MainFinalI wanted to make some sandwich rolls using my SD starter instead of yeast like I have been doing recently.  I also wanted them to be soft and fluffy so I used a Tangzhong method as well as Caputo 00 style flour and Durum.  Naturally some butter and ricotta cheese needed to be added because they usually make a good addition to any roll recipe in my opinion :).

I do have to say these were some of the best rolls I have made to date.  The crumb is nice and soft and buttery and these just taste fantastic.  I’ve been eating them for breakfast and lunch and dinner and will have to make some more soon.  Give these a try and you will not be disappointed, that I can guarantee.  Do note that the dough is rather wet so I needed to use some bench flour when shaping the rolls.

Closeup1

Buttermilk Tangzhong 00 Durum Rolls (%)

Buttermilk Tangzhong 00 Durum Rolls (weights)

Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

Note: Water amount is representative of water content in Eggs and Ricotta Cheese to get a more accurate dough hydration calculation.  Eggs are 76% water and Whole Ricotta is 72% water.  DO NOT ADD THE WATER INDICATED IN THE FINAL MIX UNLESS YOU OMIT THE EGGS AND CHEESE.

Closeup2

Tangzhong is the technique of heating a portion of the flour and liquid in your recipe to approximately 65C to make a paste (roux).  At this temperature the flour undergoes a change and gelatinizes.  By adding this roux to your final dough it will help create a soft, fluffy, moist open crumb.  It is also supposed to help prevent the bread from going stale.

It is not very difficult to do a Tangzhong.  Use a  5 to 1 liquid to solid ratio (so 250g liquid to 50g flour) and mix it together in a pan.  Heat the pan while stirring constantly.  Initially it will remain a liquid, but as you approach 65C it will undergo a change and thicken to an almost pudding like consistency.  Take it off the heat and let it cool before using it in your recipe.  Some people will refrigerate it for a while but you can use it right away as soon as it cools.

Levain Directions Build 1 (Using AP Starter at 66% Hydration for Seed)

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my Proofer set at 81 degrees and it took about 4 hours.

Main Dough Directions
Prepare the Tangzhong per directions above and allow to cool to room temperature.

Mix the flours, Tangzhong and Buttermilk together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 20-30 minutes.  Next add the salt, butter, egg, oil, cheese and starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), and  mix on low for a minute.   Mix for a total of 13 minutes in your mixer starting on low-speed and working your way up to speed #3 for the last 5 minutes.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and cut into equal size pieces and shape into rolls.  Place on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and cover with moist tea towels or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, using a simple egg wash brush each roll and sprinkle on your topping of choice.   Next add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35 minutes until the crust is nice and brown.

Take the rolls out of the oven when done and let them cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

Crumb

This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

French Style Asiago Caramelized Onions Porridge Bread

10 Sep

MainFinalIf you haven’t figured it out by now that I kind of love this whole porridge bread thing than now you finally know :).

I just finished off my last Durum Semolina with Ricotta Porridge bread and wanted to change things up a bit and add more whole grains.  This one has plenty of whole grain goodness added to the KAF French style flour including fresh rye flour, fresh spelt flour and fresh whole wheat flour along with a nice mixed grain porridge.

I wanted to caramelize some onions for pizza night so I used the left-overs in this concoction along with a healthy dose of shredded Asiago cheese.

The starter was made with my standard trusty AP stiff seed starter along with some French Style flour in 1 build this time since my mother starter was just refreshed.

I made one large Miche which ended up coming out as tasty as it gets.  A nice moist open crumb with the combination of mixed grains, cheese and onions really just make this a wonderful bread.  I highly recommend this one, but beware it is a bit sticky so you need to be used to handling wet doughs.

Closeup2

French Style Asiago Porridge Bread (%)

French Style Asiago Porridge Bread (weights)

Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

Closeup1

Levain Directions Build 1 (Using AP Starter at 66% Hydration for Seed)

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my Proofer set at 81 degrees and it took about 4 hours.

 

Oat Porridge Directions

Add about 3/4’s of the milk called for in the porridge to the dry ingredients in a small pot set to low and stir constantly until all the milk is absorbed.  Add the remainder of the milk and keep stirring until you have a nice creamy and soft porridge.  Remove from the heat and let it come to room temperature before adding to the dough.  I put mine in the refrigerator and let it cool quicker.

 

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours , wheat germ  and the water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the levain, cooled porridge and salt and mix on low for 5 minutes.  Next add the cheese and onions and mix for another minute.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).  Note: this is a pretty wet dough so you may need to do a couple of additional stretch and folds.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it’s size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Since I made a large Miche I needed to lower the temperature to 425 F for the last 15 minutes to prevent the crust from burning.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

Crumb1

 

CrumbCloseup

This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

Durum Semolina Ricotta Cheese Porridge Bread

8 Sep

FinalMainI love any bread made with Durum flour so I figured it would be a good idea to combine some fresh ricotta cheese along with a Durum starter and a porridge made with rolled oats and pearled barley.

The only problem with this bake was due to my stupidity I forgot to add in the starter which I had left in the bottom draw of my refrigerator.  The only reason why I realized I had forgotten it was due to the fact I was looking for something to snack on and discovered my error.  The lack of starter caused me to omit 95 grams of the water I was originally going to use.  Fortunately, I was able to add the starter back into the dough since it was only bulk fermenting for around 1 hour.

The end result was still a tasty loaf with a nice moderately open moist crumb.  It made great grilled bread and really was an excellent loaf.  If I had added more water it would have been a little more open and moist but all in all it was a success.

closeup1

Durum Semolina Porridge Bread (%)

Durum Semolina Porridge Bread (weights)

Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

Closeup2

Levain Directions

I made a 2 step levain by using my AP starter which is kept at 66%.

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my proofer set at 83 degrees and it took about 4 hours.  Next add the ingredients from the second levain column and mix for a minute.  Wrap with plastic wrap and let it ferment until it doubles in size.  You can use it immediately or refrigerate overnight and use the next day.

Oat Porridge Directions

Add about 3/4’s of the milk called for in the porridge to the dry ingredients in a small pot set to low and stir constantly until all the milk is absorbed.  Add the remainder of the milk and keep stirring until you have a nice creamy and soft porridge.  Remove from the heat and let it come to room temperature before adding to the dough.  I put mine in the refrigerator and let it cool quicker.

 

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours  and the water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the levain, cooled porridge and salt and mix on low for 5 minutes.  Now add the cheese and mix for another minute.  You should end up with a cohesive dough that is slightly tacky but very manageable.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it’s size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

Crumb

This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 298 other followers