Archive | August, 2013

Almost a Borodinsky Bread with Chocolate Malt

30 Aug

MainShot  Ever since I read about this bread baked by Varda (recipe here) on The Fresh Loaf website I have wanted to try to bake one.  I managed to pick up what I thought was Chocolate Malted Rye which is one of the key ingredients at a local brewers supply store.  Unfortunately I later learned that what I bought was chocolate malted barley.  Never the less I still figured it was worth giving it a go anyway.

You are also supposed to use a Pullman pan with a lid for this bake but since I don’t currently own one I used a standard baking tin and covered the bread for most of the bake with aluminum foil.  I think it worked out okay, but next time I will buy a Pullman pan and see if it makes much of  difference.

Following Varda’s advise I tried to dock the dough and separated the sides with a spatula to avoid cracking on the top.  I still ended up with some cracking so I guess I need to try something else next time.

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Nice and Bubbly

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Overall I think the bread came out pretty good for my first attempt.  It has a nice moist crumb with a pretty hard crust.  I have never eaten this type of bread before so I’m not sure what it is supposed to taste like, but mine is very sour which I imagine may mellow after it sit for another 12 hours or so.  I ate a piece after about 18 hours which is the longest I could wait.

The chocolate malted barley smelled so good when mixed with the sour; almost good enough to eat like cake batter.

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I am going to try and get some authentic malted rye for the next attempt.  I used only the malted chocolate barley for this bake even though Varda’s formula called for some plain malted rye which I did not have.  Not sure what kind of difference that made in the final taste profile.

I will have to give a 100% rye version of this style bread in the near future after I return from my trip to China next month.

Happy baking everyone.

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This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

 
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Buttermilk Sour Cream Oat Sourdough Tangzhong Rolls

28 Aug

Mainshot  I have made sourdough rolls using the Tangzhong method before and they usually come out great.  I decide to change it up a bit and used buttermilk instead of cream or milk and added some sour cream for an added flavor boost.  I also added some fresh parmesan cheese and used rolled oats, white rye and spelt flour to try to make it a little healthy.

I have to say when these were baking the whole house smelled amazing.

The final rolls came out nice and fluffy and soft but with a ton of flavor.  One bad thing about working from home is the temptation to eat and I have to say I sampled way too many of these rolls when they were done.

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Formula

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Note: Tangzhong consisted of 50 grams Bread Flour and 250 grams heavy cream.  I included this in the overall formula below.

Levain Directions

Mix all the levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I usually do this the night before.

Either use in the main dough immediately or refrigerate for up to 1 day before using.

 Main Dough Procedure

Prepare the Tangzhong.   Use a  5 to 1 liquid to solid ratio (so 250g liquid to 50g flour) and mix it together in a pan.  Heat the pan while stirring constantly.  Initially it will remain a liquid, but as you approach 65C it will undergo a change and thicken to an almost pudding like consistency.  Take it off the heat and let it cool before using it in your recipe.  Some people will refrigerate it for a while but you can use it right away as soon as it cools..

Mix the flours, Tangzhong, rolled oats and buttermilk together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 20-30 minutes.  Next add the salt, starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), sour cream, eggs, cheese and butter  and mix on low for a minute.   Mix for a total of 6 minutes in your mixer starting on low-speed and working your way up to speed #2 for the last 4 minutes.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and cut into equal size pieces and shape into rolls.  Place on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and cover with moist tea towels or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.

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The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 500 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, using a simple egg wash or heavy cream or milk, brush each roll and sprinkle on your topping of choice (I used dried scallions).  Next add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

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After 1 minute lower the temperature to 425 degrees.  Bake for 35 minutes until the crust is nice and brown.

Take the rolls out of the oven when done and let them cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

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Where oh where is Max hiding??

 

Spelt Multi-grain Walnut Sourdough Bread

21 Aug

GroupFinal I wanted to make a fairly uncomplicated bread with a good portion of spelt flour and while I was at it I decided to add some walnuts since I love nuts and my new apprentice Max is quite the nut as well.

My wife picked up some chocolate infused olive oil on close-out at William Sonoma so I figured that along with some chocolate vinegar would be a good compliment to the mix of nutty flours along with the walnuts.  I’m not sure you really end up tasting too much chocolate flavor but it did add some nice chocolate undertones to the final bread.

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New Apprentice Max Loving the Sand

I let the flours autolyse with the water overnight for around 12 hours before mixing in the other ingredients and let it bulk ferment for another 12 plus hours before baking it off.

The final bread was a nice nutty, chewy bread perfect for some hard cheese or olive oil.  The crumb was nice and moist and open and the spelt flour really added a wonderful taste to this one.

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Levain Directions

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my proofer set at 83 degrees and it took about 4 hours.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours with the water for about 1 minute.  Place it in a covered bowl and let it sit at room temperature or in your refrigerator overnight for around 12 hours.

The next day cut the starter in pieces and add it along with the oil and vinegar to the dough and mix on low-speed or by hand for 4 minutes.  Next add the chopped walnuts and mix until incorporated for about 1 minute.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired and cover with a moist towel or oiled plastic wrap.  The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it’s size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 500 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

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After 1 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

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Multi-grain Sourdough Date Bread

11 Aug

Final   This bread was inspired by my friend I met on The Fresh Loaf website, Khalid.   His beautiful bread was a 100% whole wheat version using yeast while for my version I chose to convert the recipe to sourdough and used three different whole grain flours instead of one.

I decided to use my trusty Krups coffee grinder to make fresh ground flour for the entire recipe and I was quite happy with the results.

I used a 2 step build for the starter mixing Einkorn Ancient Whole Wheat with a Hard White Whole Wheat.

For the main dough I used one of my favorite flours Kamut which is similar to Durum but more wholesome with a stronger wheat flavor.  I also used more of the Hard White Whole Wheat.

The dates are simmered in part of the water used for the main dough and I then chopped them up in the food processor before adding them to the dough.  In hindsight I should have hand chopped them instead since I ended up with more of a paste and you don’t really see too many of the dates in the final bread.

All in all this is a nice tasty bread that would only be better if I left bigger pieces of the sweet dates.

I just had a couple of pieces for breakfast with some fresh mozzarella and it was quite tasty.

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Date-Sourdough-bread

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Shade Garden in Full Bloom

Levain Directions

Step 1

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my proofer set at 83 degrees and it took about 4 hours.

Step 2

Mix the flour and water with all of the levain from step 1 and let it sit at room temperature again until it is doubled.  At this point you can either use it right away or put it in the refrigerator and use it the next 1 to 2 days.

Date Preparation

Make sure there are no pits in the dates and do not trust the package like I did which claimed they were pitted dates.  Simmer the dates in 226 grams of water until they are soft.  After you remove them from the heat, add 100 grams of cold water and let the dates sit until they come back down to room temperature.

Next, I suggest you hand chop them into pieces but don’t make them too small like I did or you won’t really taste them in the final bread.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours with the remainder of the water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the dates, butter and salt and mix on low for 2 minutes and speed #2 for another 2 minutes or by hand for about 6 minutes.   You should end up with a cohesive dough that is slightly tacky but very manageable.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.  I made 1 large Miche for this bake.

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The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it’s size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 500 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

Scored

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

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Ligularia, one of my favorite shade plants

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This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

 

Max’s 100% Triple Levain Bread with Onions

3 Aug

FinishedGroup           It’s been a few weeks since my last post.  I’ve been very busy, traveling to Costa Rica on vacation which was amazing and upon my return we added another family member to our pack.  I am happy to introduce Max who is our new 9 month mixed breed puppy.

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We had a great time in Costa Rica trekking through the rain forest and hanging out in the pool and in the ocean.  It’s a beautiful country and worth visiting if you get the chance. 
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Rain Forest in Costa Rica

To welcome Max into our lives I decided to name my latest experiment in his honor.  I have been wanting to try making a sourdough where all the flour comes from the levain so I decided to build 3 different starters and incorporate all of the flour and most of the water for the dough as part of the preferment’s.I used mostly whole grain type flours and tried using a combination I though would create a nice nutty flavor.  I also couldn’t help but add some barbecued onions in the mix since I love the flavor of onions in bread.

I let the dough over-proof slightly before placing the loaves in the oven which lead to a more flat loaf than I wanted, but the taste was fantastic with a nice moist open crumb full of flavor and more than enough sour to go around.

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Directions

 Starters

Mix ingredients in a bowl for each starter until thoroughly combined.  Cover the bowl and let it sit at room temperature for around 8 hours.  The starter should almost double when ready to proceed.  (I used my proofing box set at 83 degrees and the starter were ready to use after about 5 hours.)

 Main Dough

Mix the starter together in your bowl along with the salt, oil and water for 2 minutes.  Next mix the onions in and mix for another 4-5 minutes.  Place the dough in a lightly oiled bowl and cover.  Let it sit at room temperature or in my case at 80 degrees in my proofer for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Do a total of 3 stretch and folds or more if you like until the dough starts to come together and develop sufficient gluten strength.

Next place it in your bowl covered in your refrigerator over night for at least 12 hours.  Since this dough has so much levain you don’t want to keep it in the refrigerator too long so I suggest no more than 12 hours.

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The next day, take the bowl out of your refrigerator and let it come to room temperature for around 1.5 to 2 hours.  Form the dough into loaves or your preferred shape and let it rise for about 1.5 hours or more depending on your ambient temperature.

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When the dough is ready to bake, score as desired and prepare your oven for baking with steam.

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Set your oven for 500 degrees F. at least 45 minutes before ready to bake.  When ready to bake place the loaves into your on  your oven stone with steam and lower the temperature immediately to 450 degrees.   When the loaves are nice and brown and reached an internal temperature of 200 degrees F. you can remove it from the oven.

Let the loaves cool down for at least an 3 hours or so before eating as desired.

This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

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Max’s Fortress of Solitude

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Pool

Amazing Pool at Westin Resort

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Swim-up Bar at Resort….Life is Good!

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Costa Rican Lake Leading up to Volcano

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It’s Nice Being Green