Archive | May, 2014

Roasted Corn & Red Peppers Sourdough

31 May

Main  This is a big one…and a tasty one, great with some barbeque.  If you are on a diet the butter and yogurt in this one is not going to do you any favors, but both added to the overall moistness in the final dough.

I love the way the roasted red peppers compliment the corn and the combination of Semolina flour along with the other flours really gives this bread a unique flavor worth trying.

Since this was such a big bread it took almost 1.5 hours to bake and the corn sticking through on the crust was charred beyond recognition, but the crust is nice and crunching with a moderately open and moist crumb.

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Roasted Corn & Red Peppers Sourdough (weights)

Roasted Corn & Red Peppers Sourdough (%)

You can download the BreadStorm files here.

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Levain Directions

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.   (Note: I used my AP 66% starter for the seed.) Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours with the main dough water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the levain, Greek Yogurt, butter (softened) and salt and mix on low for 5 minutes.   Next add the roasted corn and peppers and mix for another 1-2 minutes until they are both incorporated.  You should end up with a cohesive dough that is slightly tacky but very manageable.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it’s size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees and bake for an hour.  If the crust is getting too dark, lower the temperature to 425 degrees and bake for another 30 minutes or until the inner temperature is 205 – 210 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

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This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

Oat Porridge Potato Rolls

23 May

Closeup1        I really loved the way the last Oat Porridge Bread came out so I wanted to try a variation adding some potatoes an also introduce some kamut into the flour mix.  I decided at the last moment to throw in some shaved Parmesan just because I love cheese.

The only mistake I made with these rolls was underestimating the amount of liquid naturally occurring in the potatoes.  Even though I cut back on the liquid from the last bake, the potatoes which are around 81% water really made it very difficult to shape into rolls the traditional way.

I decided to use an extra large muffin pan to place the poorly shaped rolls and it worked out great.  These are some tasty rolls and were perfect for the turkey burgers with caramelized onions and fresh Parmesan cheese I used them for, one night for dinner.

If you want to make these yourself I would suggest cutting the water down to around 190 grams instead of 240 in the main dough.

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Porridge Potato Parmesan Rolls (%)

Porridge Potato Parmesan Rolls (weights)

 

Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

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Levain Directions

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my proofer set at 83 degrees and it took about 4 hours.

Oat Porridge Directions

Add about 3/4’s of the water called for the porridge to the rolled oats in a small pot set to low and stir constantly until all the water is absorbed.  Add the remainder of the water and keep stirring until you have a nice creamy and soft porridge.  Remove from the heat and let it come to room temperature before adding to the dough.  I put mine in the refrigerator and let it cool quicker.

 

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours  with the the water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the levain, cooled porridge, potatoes and salt and mix on low for 4 minutes.  Now add the shaved Parmesan and mix for another 2 minutes.   You should end up with a cohesive dough that is slightly tacky but very manageable.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).  Note: this is a pretty wet dough so you may need to do a couple of additional stretch and folds.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it’s size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven,  add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for around 25 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the rolls are at least 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

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This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

Ian’s Oat Porridge Bread

17 May

Main  Last week I made the Oat Porridge Bread from Tartine 3 and I loved it.  I wanted to take that basic idea and convert it to my normal procedures using a larger amount of per-fermented flour and a bulk retarding of the dough in the refrigerator.

Well I have to say it was a great success.  I find this method much easier and I think the final bread actually has a more complex flavor with the same creamy moist crumb.  I highly recommend that you try this as I know you will like it and like it a lot!

I used my standard refreshed AP starter at 66% this time instead of adding some whole wheat to the starter, mainly for convenience sake.  I also added some wheat germ which was suggested in the original formula.

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Ian's Porridge Bread (%)

Ian's Porridge Bread (weights)

Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

Levain Directions

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my proofer set at 83 degrees and it took about 4 hours.

Oat Porridge Directions

Add about 3/4’s of the water called for the porridge to the rolled oats in a small pot set to low and stir constantly until all the water is absorbed.  Add the remainder of the water and keep stirring until you have a nice creamy and soft porridge.  Remove from the heat and let it come to room temperature before adding to the dough.  I put mine in the refrigerator and let it cool quicker.

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 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours and wheat germ with the main dough and the water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the levain, cooled porridge and salt and mix on low for 4 minutes and speed #2 for another 2 minutes or by hand for about 6 minutes.   You should end up with a cohesive dough that is slightly tacky but very manageable.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).  Note: this is a pretty wet dough so you may need to do a couple of additional stretch and folds.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it’s size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

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This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

Multi-Grain with Cherry Balsamic Vinegar

14 May

Main   This is a pretty simple bread using a starter with some rye and bread flour.  The main dough includes freshly ground Whole Wheat, Spelt, Kamut, Rye and KAF Bread flour.

I added some cherry balsamic vinegar and walnut oil for some added depth and it did just the trick.

The final dough had a nice crust and crumb that was not too open but just right for this amount of whole grains.  The taste was excellent and made some real tasty sandwiches.

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Multi-Grain with Cherry Balsamic Vinegar (weights)

Multi-Grain with Cherry Balsamic Vinegar (%)

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Levain Directions

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours with the main dough water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the levain, cherry balsamic vinegar, walnut oil and salt and mix on low for 4 minutes and speed #2 for another 2 minutes or by hand for about 6 minutes.   You should end up with a cohesive dough that is slightly tacky but very manageable.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it’s size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

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This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

Oat Porridge Bread from Tartine 3

10 May

MAINI have been wanting to try this recipe since I saw the post about it on the A Breaducation site here.

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The crumb on his bake was nothing short of fantastic and looked like it would melt in your mouth.

I followed his directions mostly with a few exceptions.  I used my Bosch Universal mixer to mix up the dough for the most part except I did mix the salt in by hand.  I also held back around 25-30 grams of water in the final dough as I felt it was already more than hydrated enough which I believe was the right decision.  I used freshly ground whole wheat in the starter and in the main dough along with KAF bread flour.  I omitted the wheat germ like he did but next time I would definitely add it for some extra flavor.  I also baked this on my stone rather than in a covered dutch oven.

Since he used the dutch oven I think it did really help him get such a dark crust so maybe next time I will try that as well.

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He let his dough bulk ferment for 4 hours and I only did it for 3 hours which was more than sufficient in my case.

In the end I am really happy with how this turned out.  The crumb is nice and open with a custard like feel and the bread tastes great.

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For the next go around I would add more whole wheat flour and I’m also going to use the porridge method with some different grains.  I want to try and use the porridge method using my usual technique with a larger amount of starter and a cold bulk fermentation and see if I can get similar results.

Happy Baking and Happy Mother’s Day!

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This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

San Francisco Style Sourdough with Increased WW Part 2

2 May

MainThis is attempt number 2 with a new variation of my own for this great recipe from fellow TFL regular David Snyder.   The original from post from David is here.

My last attempt ended up pretty good but I over-proofed the loaf and and the dough stuck to my new basket.  The bread still tasted very good and I ate it all week long.

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This time I wanted to try and use a cold bulk retardation instead of shaping the final dough and retarding the loaf in the refrigerator.  I followed the original instructions but when it was time to shape the dough I put it in the refrigerator.  The next morning I let it set in my proofer set to 70 degrees for 2 hours and then shaped and proofed for about 1.2 hours at 86 degrees.

The dough had great oven rise and I was pretty happy with the final result.  I do have to say it was not as sour as the original version and I still had some irregular holes which is not something I normally get with any of my bread.

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All in all the bulk retardation method is worth a try but I think it is more sour the original way.

Happy Baking.

Ian

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