Tag Archives: wheat germ

French Style Asiago Caramelized Onions Porridge Bread

10 Sep

MainFinalIf you haven’t figured it out by now that I kind of love this whole porridge bread thing than now you finally know :).

I just finished off my last Durum Semolina with Ricotta Porridge bread and wanted to change things up a bit and add more whole grains.  This one has plenty of whole grain goodness added to the KAF French style flour including fresh rye flour, fresh spelt flour and fresh whole wheat flour along with a nice mixed grain porridge.

I wanted to caramelize some onions for pizza night so I used the left-overs in this concoction along with a healthy dose of shredded Asiago cheese.

The starter was made with my standard trusty AP stiff seed starter along with some French Style flour in 1 build this time since my mother starter was just refreshed.

I made one large Miche which ended up coming out as tasty as it gets.  A nice moist open crumb with the combination of mixed grains, cheese and onions really just make this a wonderful bread.  I highly recommend this one, but beware it is a bit sticky so you need to be used to handling wet doughs.

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French Style Asiago Porridge Bread (%)

French Style Asiago Porridge Bread (weights)

Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

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Levain Directions Build 1 (Using AP Starter at 66% Hydration for Seed)

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my Proofer set at 81 degrees and it took about 4 hours.

 

Oat Porridge Directions

Add about 3/4’s of the milk called for in the porridge to the dry ingredients in a small pot set to low and stir constantly until all the milk is absorbed.  Add the remainder of the milk and keep stirring until you have a nice creamy and soft porridge.  Remove from the heat and let it come to room temperature before adding to the dough.  I put mine in the refrigerator and let it cool quicker.

 

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours , wheat germ  and the water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the levain, cooled porridge and salt and mix on low for 5 minutes.  Next add the cheese and onions and mix for another minute.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).  Note: this is a pretty wet dough so you may need to do a couple of additional stretch and folds.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it’s size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Since I made a large Miche I needed to lower the temperature to 425 F for the last 15 minutes to prevent the crust from burning.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

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This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

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The Iron Hand Knight’s Challenge Bread–A Porridge Miche

28 Jun

Main I love challenge bakes and thanks to Karin from Brot and Bread and TFL we had plenty of fun with this one.  I won’t repeat the background of this famous German Knight, but I will tell you that my apprentices Max and Lexi as well as Mookie were more inclined to bake a bread fit for the Black Knight who tried preventing King Arthur from continuing his quest for the Holy Grail.  I had to explain to them that unfortunately the Black Knight would have had much difficulty eating this bread having no appendages left to use.

BlackKnightfinal04_kn-3Alas, either way I believe my third attempt at this hearty multi-grain porridge bread was well worth it and certainly worthy of a Knight with one hand or even no hands!

I used an Organic Six Grain Flake mixture from King Arthur Flour and added plenty of ancient grains and some potatoes for moisture as well.

My first 2 attempts at a similar bread were not worthy of a knight nor a knave as they both ended up looking like flying saucers for several reasons including accidentally adding too much water to the starter.  In any event the third and final version came out great and is a tasty and hearty bread with a thick crust and creamy crumb.

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Iron-Hand Knight's Bread Challenge (%)

Iron-Hand Knight's Bread Challenge (weights)

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Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

Levain Directions

I built the Levain up in two stages starting with my 66% Hydration AP starter.  You can adjust accordingly depending on your starter.

Levain Build 1

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my proofer set at 83 degrees and it took about 4 hours.

Levain Build 2

Add the water, AP and Kamut flour to your Build 1 Levain and mix thoroughly until incorporated.  Cover and let rise until doubled which should take around 5-6 hours at room temperature.  You can now use this immediately in the main dough or refrigerate for 1-2 days before using.

Oat Porridge Directions

Add about 3/4’s of the milk called for in the porridge to the dry ingredients in a small pot set to low and stir constantly until all the milk is absorbed.  Add the remainder of the milk and keep stirring until you have a nice creamy and soft porridge.  Remove from the heat and let it come to room temperature before adding to the dough.  I put mine in the refrigerator and let it cool quicker.

 

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours  and the water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the levain, cooled porridge and salt and mix on low for 1 minute and then add the potatoes and honey.  Mix on speed #2 for another 5 minutes.   You should end up with a cohesive dough that is tacky but  manageable.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).  Note: this is a pretty wet dough so you may need to do a couple of additional stretch and folds.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it’s size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.  (Note: since I made a large Miche I lowered the temperature after around 35 minutes to 425 degrees so the crust wouldn’t burn).

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

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OrangeConeflower

The Cone Flowers are Starting to Bloom…my favorites

 

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This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

Porridge Bread Act III

8 Jun

Main   I’m really loving the whole porridge in bread thing.  Last week I adapted the original version to my own technique and it came out great, so now I figured it was time to get some more whole grain goodness into this formula.

I decided to make a double sized recipe this time so I would have one to freeze for later in the week but didn’t realize my baking stone is not big enough to fit 2 of these big boys at the same time.  I really need to get some baking stone squares to utilize the rest of my oven.  Anyway, I changed up the porridge part by adding cracked wheat and rye chops to the rolled oats along with milk instead of water.  I think this really added to the flavor of this bread in a good way.

HoneySuckle

Honeysuckle

I also added some whole rye to the main dough as well as increased the amount of whole wheat of which I used my freshly milled version.  The rest of the formula was the same as last time.

The final bread came out excellent, with the extra whole grains really giving this a much stronger sourdough flavor and nutty flavor.  Definitely a bread worth baking again and again.

I know some of you enjoy my photos from my gardens and some of the flowers are starting to bloom so I hope you don’t mind that I inserted a few in this post.

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Peony

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Transcendentia-Spider Wort

Ian's Porridge Bread 3 (%)

Ian's Porridge Bread 3 (weights)

Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

Levain Directions

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my proofer set at 83 degrees and it took about 4 hours.

Oat Porridge Directions

Add about 3/4’s of the milk called for in the porridge to the dry ingredients in a small pot set to low and stir constantly until all the milk is absorbed.  Add the remainder of the milk and keep stirring until you have a nice creamy and soft porridge.  Remove from the heat and let it come to room temperature before adding to the dough.  I put mine in the refrigerator and let it cool quicker.

 

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours and wheat germ  and the water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the levain, cooled porridge and salt and mix on low for 4 minutes and speed #2 for another 2 minutes or by hand for about 6 minutes.   You should end up with a cohesive dough that is slightly tacky but very manageable.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).  Note: this is a pretty wet dough so you may need to do a couple of additional stretch and folds.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it’s size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

Below was my dinner from a few nights ago.  Nothing as fancy as DA, but not too shabby :).  Some pasta with caramelized onions, grilled red peppers, grilled corn, fresh mozzarella, shaved Parmesan, and mushroom pork sausages along with a grilled slice of Porridge Bread.

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Clematis

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Poppy

Oriental Poppy

 

Sedum

Assorted Sedum

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Assorted Shade Garden Plants

 

 

This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

Ian’s Oat Porridge Bread

17 May

Main  Last week I made the Oat Porridge Bread from Tartine 3 and I loved it.  I wanted to take that basic idea and convert it to my normal procedures using a larger amount of per-fermented flour and a bulk retarding of the dough in the refrigerator.

Well I have to say it was a great success.  I find this method much easier and I think the final bread actually has a more complex flavor with the same creamy moist crumb.  I highly recommend that you try this as I know you will like it and like it a lot!

I used my standard refreshed AP starter at 66% this time instead of adding some whole wheat to the starter, mainly for convenience sake.  I also added some wheat germ which was suggested in the original formula.

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Ian's Porridge Bread (%)

Ian's Porridge Bread (weights)

Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

Levain Directions

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my proofer set at 83 degrees and it took about 4 hours.

Oat Porridge Directions

Add about 3/4’s of the water called for the porridge to the rolled oats in a small pot set to low and stir constantly until all the water is absorbed.  Add the remainder of the water and keep stirring until you have a nice creamy and soft porridge.  Remove from the heat and let it come to room temperature before adding to the dough.  I put mine in the refrigerator and let it cool quicker.

WideShot

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours and wheat germ with the main dough and the water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the levain, cooled porridge and salt and mix on low for 4 minutes and speed #2 for another 2 minutes or by hand for about 6 minutes.   You should end up with a cohesive dough that is slightly tacky but very manageable.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).  Note: this is a pretty wet dough so you may need to do a couple of additional stretch and folds.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it’s size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

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This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

Multi-Grain Urbrot “Challenge Bread”

6 Oct

Final1Karen from Brot & Brad and the Fresh Loaf posted an exciting baking challenge to create a German style multi-grain rye bread called an Urbrot.  This was based on her recent trip to Germany while visiting Fredrick the Great’s Sanssouci.  Please read her excellent write-up on her travels and a recap of all the challenge bakes from fellow TFL members here.

I finally had some time to take up the challenge and decided to bake my version similar to a Bordinsky.  Please take a look at Varda’s (recipe here) from The Fresh Loaf website for the play by-play.

I did borrow from Janet’s recipe on the Fresh Loaf for my percentages and I followed her procedure for the Sour build.  In retrospect since I was using my AP starter to create the Sour I should have built it in 2 steps and not 1.  I had to wait around 8 hours for the Sour to activate and it still could have been more active for my taste.  Next time I would follow the multi-step build Varda included.

I’m not sure the bakers percentages are accurate in my formula below, but if you follow the ingredients list and amounts you will be fine.

The Harvest Grain blend mix from King Arthur flour includes the following ingredients: Whole oat berries, millet, rye flakes, wheat flakes, flax seeds, poppy seeds, sesame seeds and sunflower seeds. In addition to using this mix I added pecans, baked potato, almond flour, wild mushroom and sage olive oil and a bunch more whole grains.

I used dark rye flour from King Arthur Flour which they call Pumpernickel flour and just to make things interesting I added dehydrated onions to the sour mix and used coffee for part of the liquid.

All in all this came out excellent for this type of bread.  I am not sure how to describe the flavor profile but it was mildly sour and chock-full of flavor.

Urbrot-Challenge-Bread-1

Urbrot-Challenge-Bread-2

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This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

 

Double Trouble Multi-grain Sourdough

11 May

Group2    I just finished up the last of my decadent cream cheese rolls so it was time to bake a more healthy hearty bread but one that is not too heavy either.

I decided to try a double starter which I’ve done in the past.  My first inclination for this bread was to try an experiment and make all of the flour come from the pre-ferment but I chickened out at the last moment and only upped the starter amount slightly from my normal formulas.

I converted my AP starter after refreshing it into 2 distinct starters at close to 100% hydration.  The first starter consisted of durum flour and French style KAF flour and the second was hand ground (with my coffee grinder that is) Einkorn ancient wheat mixed with my AP seed starter.

For the main ingredients I added some additional Einkorn flour, French, Durum, potato flour, rye chops and Toasted Wheat  Germ for some added nuttiness.

The dough was quite sticky after mixing but came together quite nicely.

The final result was a surprisingly sour dough but in a good way with a nice nutty whole grain flavor.  I did not sift the Einkorn flour but used the entire ground flour which you can really taste in the final bread.

Pig

You will notice a big hunk of one of the breads in the final photo has gone missing.  I would say the alligator ate it, or one of my apprentices, but alas it was my wife who upon returning from shopping thought it was a good idea to lop off a nice chunk before I had a chance to photograph it.  At least she seemed to like it, or it could have been because it was the first thing she had eaten all day.  I guess I will never know…..

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Levain Directions

(Note: the formula below lists the levains as 2 steps but they are 2 different levains not one.)

Mix all the levain ingredients together for #1  and #2 for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.

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 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours, rye chops, wheat germ and water (hold back about 50 grams for now)  together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 20-30 minutes.  Next add the salt, starters and olive oil and mix on low for a minute.  Add the rest of the water unless the dough is way too wet.   Mix on low-speed for another 4 minutes.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.  I made 2 loaves free form and placed them onto my bakers linen and covered them up.

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The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it’s size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 500 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

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Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

Scored

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

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Yeast Water Turkey Whole Wheat Smoked Cheddar Buttermilk Bread

22 Mar

FinalBread I haven’t made bread with my Yeast Water starter in a while so I figured I would try making a YW levain using my proofer set at 86 degrees F. and see how it came out.  I was hoping the proofer would allow the YW levain to develop better than it usually does and it did not disappoint.  The levain was made in 2 builds with the first one lasting 7 hours and the second about 4 hours.

Since I was not going to use my sourdough starter in this one I figured I would use some buttermilk to give the dough a little bit of tang.  I wanted to make at least a 50 plus percent whole grain bread so I used the Turkey Hard Red Wheat flour again along with some Organic Bread flour from KAF, Barley flour, Wheat Germ for some nuttiness and some Potato flour to round it out.

I picked up some smoked cheddar just for this bread and added some walnut oil to add a bit more nuttiness as well.

I followed a similar time schedule using my proofer as I did for my last bake using my normal bulk fermentation for the dough to develop the flavor.

The final dough came out as good as expected with a nice dark crust with cheesy goodness throughout the tender open crumb.

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YeastwaterTurkeyWheatSmokedCheddarButtermilkBread

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Levain Directions Build 1

Mix all the levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  (Note: I used my proofer set at 85 degrees).

Either use in the main dough immediately or refrigerate for up to 1 day before using.

Levain Directions Build 2

Add all the ingredients listed to the levain from Build 1 and mix well.  Let it sit in your proofer or a warm place about 85 degrees for 4-5 hours until the starter is nice and bubbly and has doubled in size.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours, buttermilk and water together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 20-30 minutes.  Next add the salt, starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), walnut oil, and mix on low for 4 minutes.  Next add the cheese (cut into small cubes) and mix on low-speed for another 2 minute to incorporate the cheese evenly.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  (Note: I used my proofer set at 80 degrees). After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  ( I used my proofer set at 80 degrees F.)   Remove the dough and shape as desired.  I made 1 large miche but you can make 2 boules or other shapes.  Place your dough into your proofing basket(s) and cover with a moist tea towel.

RisingBasket I put the dough in my proofer set at 85 degrees F.  The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature or it will take 1.5 hours in the proofer.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 500 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.Scored

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  For the large Miche I baked at 450 F. for 35 minutes and another 40 minutes at 425 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

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