Tag Archives: sprouted wheat

Sprouted Wheat Pain Au Levain (Bread Revolution)

19 Nov

DSC_0002This is my third attempt of the Pain Au Levain formula from Peter Reinhart’s new book “Bread Revolution”.

The first 2 did not come out correctly.  I now suspect the main culprit was that I did not dry out the sprouted winter wheat berries enough and the flour was too moist.  This time I let it dry out using a fan for a day and half and the bread came out much better.

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I used my AP starter and did not add any yeast.  I also let the bulk dough rise for a bit in my proofer set at 80 degrees before refrigerating.  The next day I let it sit out for an hour before shaping and proofing at 80 degrees for around 3 hours.

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I did not achieve much oven spring but the crumb is nice and moist and not gummy like the last bake.

This tastes like nothing I have baked ever before.  The sprouted grains really do add such a unique flavor.  I can’t wait to start experimenting with different sprouted grains when I return from my annual pilgrimage to North Carolina for Thanks Giving.

Happy Holidays to everyone.

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MOUNTAIN OAT RYE (POLAND)

13 Nov

MainThis is the fourth recipe I have been asked to test from the upcoming Rye Bread baking book by Stan Ginsberg.  This one was much different than the first three.  It ended up being pretty simple to make and the final bread had a very tender crumb and soft crust with a nice mild tang to it.

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This is definitely one I would make again.

I also baked my second attempt at the Sprouted Wheat Pain Au Levain from Peter Reinhart’s new book “Bread Revolution”.  I am really enjoying reading the book so far but unfortunately my first two attempts at this recipe did not come out correctly.  I am using my own sprouted flour and I think I didn’t let the sprouted berries dry enough which could have an effect on the final outcome of my dough.

The first attempt I let the dough over-proof and it had no oven rise and ended up being a door stop.  The second attempt below I thought I proofed it correctly but it may have been under-proofed.  It still had no oven rise to speak of and ended up with a very gummy crumb.  Both attempts were not really edible.  Once I stock up on some more wheat berries I will give this another go and hope for better results.

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Stay tuned for the next 2 recipes from the Rye book soon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multi-Grain Urbrot “Challenge Bread”

6 Oct

Final1Karen from Brot & Brad and the Fresh Loaf posted an exciting baking challenge to create a German style multi-grain rye bread called an Urbrot.  This was based on her recent trip to Germany while visiting Fredrick the Great’s Sanssouci.  Please read her excellent write-up on her travels and a recap of all the challenge bakes from fellow TFL members here.

I finally had some time to take up the challenge and decided to bake my version similar to a Bordinsky.  Please take a look at Varda’s (recipe here) from The Fresh Loaf website for the play by-play.

I did borrow from Janet’s recipe on the Fresh Loaf for my percentages and I followed her procedure for the Sour build.  In retrospect since I was using my AP starter to create the Sour I should have built it in 2 steps and not 1.  I had to wait around 8 hours for the Sour to activate and it still could have been more active for my taste.  Next time I would follow the multi-step build Varda included.

I’m not sure the bakers percentages are accurate in my formula below, but if you follow the ingredients list and amounts you will be fine.

The Harvest Grain blend mix from King Arthur flour includes the following ingredients: Whole oat berries, millet, rye flakes, wheat flakes, flax seeds, poppy seeds, sesame seeds and sunflower seeds. In addition to using this mix I added pecans, baked potato, almond flour, wild mushroom and sage olive oil and a bunch more whole grains.

I used dark rye flour from King Arthur Flour which they call Pumpernickel flour and just to make things interesting I added dehydrated onions to the sour mix and used coffee for part of the liquid.

All in all this came out excellent for this type of bread.  I am not sure how to describe the flavor profile but it was mildly sour and chock-full of flavor.

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This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

 

Hurricane “Cosmo” Kitty Ale Sourdough Bread

19 Mar

closeup1     As I mentioned in my previous post I recently purchased a Brod and Taylor proofer and I have been experimenting with it to see how it affects the sourness and overall bread.

For this latest bread I decided to let the starter ferment at 85 degrees inside the proofer for around 10 hours.  Probably could have cut the time down considerably in hindsight but it doesn’t look like the extended time really hand any effect on the overall bread.

When I mixed the starter which had French style flour along with Durum flour along with the flour for the main dough I let it sit inside the proofer for 2 hours at 85 degrees while I did my normal stretch and folds at 15 minute intervals for a total of 3 S&F’s.

I used one of the Ale’s I purchased a few weeks ago called Hurricane Kitty in place of most of the water and since one of my apprentices insisted on helping on this particular bake I named it after him.

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The next day I took the dough out of the refrigerator and put it in the proofer at 80 degrees for 1.5 hours.  I shaped the loaves and let it proof again but at 85 degrees for around 1.5 hours before baking.

The final result was excellent.  A nice open crumb with not too thick of a crust. The onions really came through and the small amount of sprouted wheat really combined well with the French flour and Durum flour.  The crumb is very soft and it made a perfect sandwich bread for my pastrami.  I really like the way this one came out and will make this one again for sure.

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Hurricane Kitty Bread 3-16-13  HurricaneAle

Levain Directions

Mix all the levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  (Note: I used my proofer set at 86 degrees F.)  I usually do this the night before.

Either use in the main dough immediately or refrigerate for up to 1 day before using.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours, and Hurricane Kitty Ale together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 20-30 minutes.  While that is resting mix the onions in the water and let it rest.  Next add the salt, starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), walnut oil, and rehydrated onions in water and mix on low for 4 minutes.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Note: I used my proofer set at 85 degrees).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator or proofer and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  (Note: I used the proofer set at 80 degrees).  Next remove the dough and shape as desired.  and place your dough into your proofing basket(s) and cover with a moist tea towel or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.  The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  (I let the dough proof in my proofer for 1.5 hours at 85 degrees).  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.Baskets

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 500 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.  I forgot to include the black sesame seeds I used on one of the loaves.  I simply spritzed the loaf with some water and then sprinkled the seeds on.Scored

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

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Mudslide Coffee Multi-Grain Sourdough

21 Jun

For someone who doesn’t like to drink coffee, I must say I love adding it to my bread.  It adds a subtle flavor to the overall product that is very pleasing and smells good to boot.

I recently bought some Red Wheat Berries and Farro on my latest trip to Whole Foods so I wanted to make a soaker using these ingredients and see what happens.  I also added some oat bran to the soaker as well.

I used some White Rye Flour, Pumpernickel, Sprouted Wheat Flour and French Style (low protein flour good for baguettes) and of course some Mudslide flavored coffee as the liquid.

In order to make the soaker I used a cup of hot water and mixed it with the ingredients and let sit at room temperature for 24 hours.  Since the Red Wheat and Farro are very hard, I should have used boiling water or actually boil it on the stove in water for a longer period to make it tender.  My soak in hot water did not end up making the soaker ingredients tender enough so they ended up a little chewier in the final bread than I would have preferred.

For the starter, I refreshed my standard AP white starter the night before and used most of it in this bake.  I have also included the ingredients to make the exact amount of starter needed from your seed starter.  Mine is kept at 65% hydration so adjust yours accordingly.

Soaker

50 grams Farro

30 grams Red Wheat Berries

30 grams Oat Bran

240 grams Boiling Water

Mix boiling water in a bowl with other ingredients and let sit covered at room temperature for 24 hours.

Starter

71 grams Seed (Mine is 65% AP Flour Starter)

227 grams AP Flour

151 grams Water (85 – 90 degrees F.)

Mix seed with water to break up for a few seconds and then mix in flour until the starter form a smooth dough consistency.  Put it in a lightly oiled bowl and loosely cover and leave at room temperature for at least 10 hours.  The starter should double in volume.  Put the starter in the refrigerator for up to 1-2 days or use it immediately.

Main Dough

Ingredients

425 grams Starter from above (all of the starter)

180 grams French Style Flour

150 grams Sprouted Wheat Flour

200 grams White Rye Flour

100 grams Pumpernickel Flour

370 grams Mudslide Coffee (90 degrees F.)

14 grams Sea Salt (or table salt)

Procedure

I mixed  the flours together with all the coffee except for 50 grams and let them autolyes for 30 minutes.    After an hour  I added the levain and the soaker and the rest of the coffee with the salt and mixed on speed #1 for 1 minute and #2 for 4 minutes.  I then did a stretch and fold, rested the dough uncovered for 10 minutes.  I then did another stretch and fold, covered the dough and let it rest for 10 minutes.  I did one more stretch and fold and put it in a lightly oiled bowl for 2 hours.  I then put it in the fridge overnight.

The next day I let the dough sit out at room temperature for 1.5 hours.  After 1.5 hours I formed it into loaves and put them in floured bannetons and let them rise covered for 2 hours.  Score the loaves as desired and prepare your oven for baking with steam.

I then baked on my oven stone with steam at 450 degrees until both loaves were golden brown and reached an internal temperature of 200 – 210 degrees F.

I got a nice bloom with my scoring, actually more than I expected.  One loaf I tried a curved scoring pattern which came out pretty nice.

The final bread came out like I had hoped with a nice crust and open moist crumb.  You can taste the coffee influences for sure as well as the multi-grain ingredients.

This bread has been submitted to Yeast Spotting here at http://www.wildyeastblog.com/

Sprouted Wheat with Oat Flour

2 Jun

I just received my new order from KAF the other day and was dying to try some of my new flours I ordered.  I wasn’t too happy though when I received an email the day after it arrived telling me how excited I should be about the KAF 20% off sale!

Anyway I digress….I decided to try my new Sprouted Wheat Flour which was not milled by KAF but apparently they distribute this brand.  I also another new interesting flour which was made from 100% oats.  Along with these 2 flours I added a large amount of French Style Flour which added to the silkiness of this dough.  I have used this flour many times before and it is great for baguettes or ciabatta but I also find it very nice for developing the nice open crumb I like.

I refreshed my standard AP white starter the night before and used most of it in this bake.  I have also included the ingredients to make the exact amount of starter needed from your seed starter.  Mine is kept at 65% hydration so adjust yours accordingly.

The final dough was a nice mild sourdough with a hint of nuttiness from the oat flour and sprouted wheat flour.  The crumb was not too moist and had a nice open crumb and overall this was a nice bread worth making again for sure.  I used it for a nice pastrami sandwich last night which I ate while tailgating at the Brad Paisley concert at Jones beach.  I am not a big fan of country music by I do have to say he puts on a great show.  Could have done without the rain storm and cold winds in June but we all had fun anyway.

Starter

71 grams Seed (Mine is 65% AP Flour Starter)

227 grams AP Flour

151 grams Water (85 – 90 degrees F.)

Mix seed with water to break up for a few seconds and then mix in flour until the starter form a smooth dough consistency.  Put it in a lightly oiled bowl and loosely cover and leave at room temperature for at least 10 hours.  The starter should double in volume.  Put the starter in the refrigerator for up to 1-2 days or use it immediately.

Main Dough

Ingredients

425 grams Starter from above (all of the starter)

200 grams French Style Flour

200 grams Sprouted Wheat Flour

167 grams Oat Flour

425 grams Water (90 degrees F.)

18 grams Sea Salt (or table salt)

Procedure

I mixed  the flours together with all the water except for 50 grams and let them autolyes for 1 hour.    After an hour  I added the levain and the water with the salt and mixed on speed #1 for 1 minute and #2 for 4 minutes.  I then did a stretch and fold, rested the dough uncovered for 10 minutes.  I then did another stretch and fold, covered the dough and let it rest for 10 minutes.  I did one more stretch and fold and put it in a lightly oiled bowl for 1.5 hours.  I then put it in the fridge overnight.

The next day I let the dough sit out at room temperature for 1.5 hours.  After 1.5 hours I formed it into loaves and put them in floured bannetons and let them rise covered for 2 hours.  Score the loaves as desired and prepare your oven for baking with steam.

I then baked on my oven stone with steam at 450 degrees until both loaves were golden brown and reached an internal temperature of 200 – 210 degrees F.

I got a nice bloom with my scoring, actually more than I expected.  One loaf I tried a curved scoring pattern which came out pretty nice.

It was so nice outside yesterday I decided to shoot the finished loaves outside in my garden.  The summer flours  flowers are just starting to bloom in earnest making this one of my favorite times of the year.

This bread has been submitted to Yeast Spotting here at http://www.wildyeastblog.com/