Tag Archives: freshly ground whole wheat

Sweet Potato Multi-grain Bread

11 Apr

I’ve made bread with sweet potatoes before, but I have to say this is my best one yet.  Moist and flavorful there’s not much to complain about on this one.

I used a combo of freshly ground flours as well as Caputo 00 type flour.  The cottage cheese, eggs and roasted sweet potatoes created a moist and flavorful bread.

Note: Water content of whole eggs is 80 grams, Cottage Cheese 81 grams, Sweet Potatoes 145 grams for a total of 306 grams.  This was not included in the formula so the hydration of this bread is much higher than listed.

Formula

Download the BreadStorm File Here.

Levain Directions

Mix all the Levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.

Either use in the main dough immediately or refrigerate for up to 1 day before using.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours, roasted sweet potatoes, cottage cheese, eggs and 200 grams of water together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 20-30 minutes up to an hour.  Next add the salt, starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), walnut oil and water (as needed) and mix on low for 5 minutes.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (If you have a proofer you can set it to 80 degrees and follow above steps but you should be finished in 1 hour to 1.5 hours).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.   Place your dough into your proofing basket(s) and cover with a moist tea towel or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.  The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 25-35 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 200 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

Caramelized Onion, Maple Bread

5 Jun

DSC_0007 If you love onions this one is for you.  I had some leftover caramelized onions that my wife had cooked up so I decided to incorporate them into my next bread.  I thought adding some maple syrup would give this a nice overall sweetness and some Greek yogurt was added to soften the crumb.

I used a combination of medium rye, fresh whole wheat and French style flour from KAF.

The final result was an over the top onion tasting bread with a little extra kick of sweetness from the maple syrup.  I was disappointed with the crumb as it was much tighter than it should have been, but it still tastes just fine :).

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Formula

Caramelized Maple Onion Bread  (%)

Caramelized Maple Onion Bread  (weights)

Download the BreadStorm File Here.

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Levain Directions

Mix all the Levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 8-12 hours or until the starter is nice and bubbly.

Either use in the main dough immediately or refrigerate for up to 1 day before using.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours with the water, yogurt and maple syrup together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 20-30 minutes.  Next add the salt and starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces) and mix on low for 5 minutes.  Add the onions and mix for an additional minute.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (If you have a proofer you can set it to 80 degrees and follow above steps but you should be finished in 1 hour to 1.5 hours).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.   Place your dough into your proofing basket(s) and cover with a moist tea towel or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.  The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock. (I use a proofer set to 78-79 degrees and it usually takes 1 hour for initial proof and 1 hour for final proof after shaping).

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 500 degrees and after another 3 minutes lower it to 450 degrees.  Bake for 25-35 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 210 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

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A few more garden photos.

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Durum Polenta Ricotta Porridge Bread

19 Dec

MainI haven’t made a porridge bread in a while so sticking with my Durum kick I figured Polenta would go well Durum and used that along with some rolled oats and barley flakes in the porridge.

I made a starter with mostly Durum flour and added some 00 Caputo flour along with freshly milled Whole Wheat to the main flour mix.

The added fresh ricotta cheese added to the moist soft crumb.

I baked this one Miche style and the end result was a tasty hearty bread with a nice sour tang and moist crumb.

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Durum Polenta Porridge Bread (%)

Durum Polenta Porridge Bread (weights)

Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

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Levain Directions Build 1

Mix all the Build 1 levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my proofer set at 83 degrees and it took about 4 hours.  Next add the flour and water for Build 2 and mix thoroughly.  Cover with plastic wrap and let it set again until it is bubbly and just about doubled in size.  You can use it immediately in the final dough or let it sit in your refrigerator overnight.

Porridge Directions

Add about 3/4’s of the milk called for in the porridge to the dry ingredients in a small pot set to low and stir constantly until all the milk is absorbed.  Add the remainder of the milk and keep stirring until you have a nice creamy and soft porridge.  Remove from the heat and let it come to room temperature before adding to the dough.  I put mine in the refrigerator and let it cool quicker.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours  and the water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the levain, cooled porridge, olive oil, ricotta cheese and salt and mix on low for 6 minutes.  You should end up with a cohesive dough that is slightly tacky but very manageable.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it’s size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

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Spelt Potato & Grits Porridge Bread

7 Jun

Main2  If you haven’t noticed by now I seem to like porridge breads, so it’s no surprise I made another one yesterday.  My wife had some left-over caramelized onions from her Quesadillas she made last weekend and I had some left-over potatoes so the beginnings of a bread began to form.

I wanted to use some of my fresh milled Spelt flour for this one and I also added some freshly milled whole wheat and some Caputo 00 flour to round it out.

I compensated for the 81% water content of the potatoes by cutting back the actual water added to the main dough and ended up with a nice wet but manageable dough.
The final result was a wonderfully moist and open crumb with a fantastic nutty flavor from the spelt and just enough onions to make this one a winner.

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Spelt Potato Grits Porridge Bread  (weights)

Spelt Potato Grits Porridge Bread  (%)

Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

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Levain Directions

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my proofer set at 83 degrees and it took about 4 hours.  You can use it immediately in the final dough or let it sit in your refrigerator overnight.

Porridge Directions

Add about 3/4’s of the milk called for in the porridge to the dry ingredients in a small pot set to low and stir constantly until all the milk is absorbed.  Add the remainder of the milk and keep stirring until you have a nice creamy and soft porridge.  Remove from the heat and let it come to room temperature before adding to the dough.  I put mine in the refrigerator and let it cool quicker.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours  and the water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the levain, cooled porridge, potatoes and salt and mix on low for 5 minutes.  Now add the onions and mix on low for another minute until they are incorporated.    You should end up with a cohesive dough that is slightly tacky but very manageable.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it’s size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

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Cosmo–“Panda Bear” catching some sun on the cable box.

 

Sprouted Durum – Whole Wheat Pecan Potato Bread

31 May

Angled          I love potatoes in bread and in any other form as well as pecans so I figured it was time to use both of them again in a bread.

I recently milled some fresh whole wheat flour and still had some freshly milled durum and sprouted durum flour left over from a little while ago.  I decided to add some KAF high gluten flour to strengthen the dough a little and a little walnut oil just for good measure.

The water content listed on the formula below does not include the water content from the potatoes which are 81% water so the actual hydration of the dough is around 86%.  Since the freshly milled flours are very thirsty the dough was very manageable.

The final bread came out amazing with a nice moist and open crumb perfect for toasting, grilling and just about anything you can do with bread!  I highly recommend you try this one if you get a chance and feel free to substitute your favorite nut.

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Peony

First Peony Flower of the Season

Formula

Sprouted Durum- Whole Wheat Pecan Potato Bread  (%)

Sprouted Durum- Whole Wheat Pecan Potato Bread  (weights)

Download the BreadStorm File Here.

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Levain Directions

Mix all the Levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I usually do this the night before.

Either use in the main dough immediately or refrigerate for up to 1 day before using.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours  and water together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 20-30 minutes.  Next add the salt, starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), walnut oil (or olive oil) and mashed potatoes, and mix on low for 5 minutes.  Lastly add the pecans and mix for about 1 minute until they are incorporated thoroughly.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (If you have a proofer you can set it to 80 degrees and follow above steps but you should be finished in 1 hour to 1.5 hours).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.   Place your dough into your proofing basket(s) and cover with a moist tea towel or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.  The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 500 degrees and after another 3 minutes lower it to 450 degrees.  Bake for 25-35 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 210 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

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Spider Worts

 

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36 Hour Bacon, Baked Potato and Cheese Sourdough

23 Aug

FinalBacon, Potatoes and Cheese….what else do I need to say?  Throw those golden ingredients together with some flour, water and starter and let it ferment for a couple of days and you have as tasty a loaf as you’re going to get.

I hadn’t made any bread using the 36 hour technique in a while so I figured it was time to give it a go again.  I used the last of my KAF French style flour mixed with some freshly ground whole wheat and some KAF Durum flour to round it out.

Letting the flour absorb the ice water for 24 hours and adding a 100% starter to the mix with all the other ingredients couldn’t be an easier.  You just need to have some patience and the results will be worth it.

I used some Double Gloucester cheese which is similar to a sharp cheddar and baked some potatoes I made on my grill the night before.  I fried up some thick-cut bacon the morning of the final mix.

The only thing I might chance on this one the next go around is cutting the hydration a bit.  I didn’t take the water content of the potatoes into account when formulating the original recipe and the final dough was very slack and spread out more than I would have preferred,  All in all this bread came out with a nice moist and open crumb with bits of bacon and cheese spread throughout.  It is definitely worth trying this one if you get a chance.

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36 Hour Bacon, Potato and Cheese Sourdough (%)

36 Hour Bacon, Potato and Cheese Sourdough (weights)

Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

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Directions

NOTE: Water content for potatoes is added to final Mix water amount.  Actual water to add to final dough is 600 grams.

Starter
Mix ingredients in a bowl until thoroughly combined.  Cover the bowl and let it sit at room temperature for around 8 hours.  The starter should almost double when ready to proceed.  I actually mixed it up at the same time as the flour and water mixture for the main dough and let it sit overnight.  I used my 66% seed starter and basically converted it to close to a 100% hydration levain.  You need the final levain/starter to be like this so it is easy to mix into the main dough.

Main Dough Procedure
Mix the flours and the ice water together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.   Put the dough in a slightly covered oiled bowl and put in the refrigerator for 12 hours.

The next day add your starter,  cheese, bacon, potatoes and salt to the dough and mix by hand or in your mixer on low speed until it is thoroughly mixed and evenly distributed.  Due to the high water content in the 100% hydration starter this dough is very easy to mix by hand and is very silky and smooth.

Bulk rise at room temperature for 2-3 hours until it grows around 1/3 in volume doing stretch and folds every half hour until it has developed the correct amount of strength.

Put the dough back into the refrigerator for around 20-24 hours.  I took it out about 24 hours later.

When you take the dough out of the refrigerator you want it to have almost doubled in volume, but if it doesn’t, don’t worry as it will end up okay anyway.  Let it rise at room temperature for around 2 hours or until the dough has doubled from the night before.

Next, divide the dough and shape as desired and place them in their respective basket(s).  I made a bâtard and a boule and placed both of them into my proofer set at 82 degrees F. for 1.5 hours.

Score the loaves as desired and prepare your oven for baking with steam.

Set your oven for 550 degrees F. at least 45 minutes before ready to bake.  When ready to bake place the loaves into your oven on your oven-stone with steam and let it bake for 5 minutes and then lower the temperature  to 450 degrees.    When the loaf is golden brown and reached an internal temperature of 210 degrees F. you can remove it from the oven.

Let the bread cool down for at least an 3 hours or so before eating as desired.

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This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

Oat Porridge Bread from Tartine 3

10 May

MAINI have been wanting to try this recipe since I saw the post about it on the A Breaducation site here.

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The crumb on his bake was nothing short of fantastic and looked like it would melt in your mouth.

I followed his directions mostly with a few exceptions.  I used my Bosch Universal mixer to mix up the dough for the most part except I did mix the salt in by hand.  I also held back around 25-30 grams of water in the final dough as I felt it was already more than hydrated enough which I believe was the right decision.  I used freshly ground whole wheat in the starter and in the main dough along with KAF bread flour.  I omitted the wheat germ like he did but next time I would definitely add it for some extra flavor.  I also baked this on my stone rather than in a covered dutch oven.

Since he used the dutch oven I think it did really help him get such a dark crust so maybe next time I will try that as well.

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He let his dough bulk ferment for 4 hours and I only did it for 3 hours which was more than sufficient in my case.

In the end I am really happy with how this turned out.  The crumb is nice and open with a custard like feel and the bread tastes great.

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For the next go around I would add more whole wheat flour and I’m also going to use the porridge method with some different grains.  I want to try and use the porridge method using my usual technique with a larger amount of starter and a cold bulk fermentation and see if I can get similar results.

Happy Baking and Happy Mother’s Day!

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This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.