Tag Archives: Dehydrated Onions

Rye Potato Onion Porridge Ale Bread and Holiday Rolls

25 Dec

         Happy Holidays to everyone.  As usual, we celebrated the holidays with family and friends and cooked and baked and baked some more :).

For Christmas dinner at our good friends house I always bring my homemade pirogi filled with potatoes and cheese and also a cheese only version.  I also bring some type of rye bread to accompany the spiral ham they serve.  This year I made a big miche style rye with porridge, raspberry ale, onions, mashed potatoes mixed with fresh ground rye, white rye and First Clear flour.

I made a smaller loaf to keep for myself and as you can by the crumb shot it came out nice and moist and full of rye and onion flavor.

I made some German pretzel rolls to bring to my family’s holiday dinner.  I melted some smoked Gruyere on some of them which was delicious.

For Christmas Eve I made some German Weizenbrotchen Sour dough Rolls brushed with melted garlic butter to go along with the Italian theme our friends were following.  I also melted some mixed Italian cheeses on some of them for something extra special.

I hope you all are having a great holiday season.

Here’s more details on the rye bread for those who are interested.

Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

 

Levain Directions

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my proofer set at 83 degrees and it took about 4 hours.  You can use it immediately in the final dough or let it sit in your refrigerator overnight.

Porridge Directions

Add about 3/4’s of the water called for in the porridge to the dry ingredients in a small pot set to low and stir constantly until all the water is absorbed.  Add the remainder of the water and keep stirring until you have a nice creamy and soft porridge.  Remove from the heat and let it come to room temperature before adding to the dough.  I put mine in the refrigerator and let it cool quicker.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the onions with the ale and let it sit to rehydrate for about 30 minutes or longer.

Mix the flours, ale, and the potatoes for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the levain, cooled porridge, caraway seeds and salt and mix on low for 5 minutes.  A Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it’s size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

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Ricotta Rye with Corn Flour Sourdough

19 Aug

I haven’t made a rye bread in a while and I wanted to a nice moist one that would be good for sandwiches.  The addition of the ricotta cheese and mashed potatoes made for a super moist crumb and the corn flour added a very interesting flavor profile.

I was very happy with the flavor on this one and love the moist crumb.  The onions always go well with rye of course.

I did two siftings of the freshly ground rye which was ground using my MockMill attachment for the KitchenAid mixer which really made for a light crumb coming in at over 52% rye.  All in all this one is a keeper and worth trying.

Formula

Download the BreadStorm File Here

Levain Directions

Mix all the Levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.

Either use in the main dough immediately or refrigerate for up to 1 day before using.

 Main Dough Procedure

If you are using dehydrated onions, let them hydrate in the water before proceeding to the next step. If you are using cooked or fresh onions, you can add them during the last minute of mixing.

Mix the flours and water together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 1 hour.  Next add the salt, honey, starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), ricotta cheese and potatoes and mix on low for 5 minutes.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (If you have a proofer you can set it to 80 degrees and follow above steps but you should be finished in 1 hour to 1.5 hours).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.   Place your dough into your proofing basket(s) and cover with a moist tea towel or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.  The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 25-35 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

I’ve included some late summer garden photos for those of you who are interested.

Porridge Rye Beer Bread

26 Dec

solo1  I made a version of this bread in the summer and decided to bake it again with some modifications to bring to our friends house for Christmas dinner.  I usually bring some type of rye bread to go with the Christmas ham and figured a nice moist porridge bread would do the trick.

I decided to add some beer which usually gives Rye a wonderful flavor and I also added some toasted onions to the second build of the starter to really enhance the onion flavor profile.

I cut back some of the liquid to compensate for the wetter porridge which seemed to be a result of increasing the total yield of the formula to end up with 2 large loaves.

The end result was a very wet dough but it ended up springing up nicely and the crumb was as moist as I’ve ever achieved.  The onion and rye flavors came through brilliantly and everyone seemed to like it very much with their ham.

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Porridge Rye Beer Bread (%)

Porridge Rye Beer Bread (weights)

Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

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Levain Directions

If you have a rye starter you can simply refresh and use the correct amount in the final mix.  If not, mix all the levain ingredients for Build 1 together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  One trick you can use to see if the starter is ready for build 2 is to sprinkle some rye flour on-top and when it cracks you are ready to go.  If you have a proofer you can cut down the time by setting it to 78 degrees.  It usually takes me about 3-4 hours using the proofer.

When you are ready for Build 2, mix in the remaining ingredients and hold back some of the rye flour and sprinkle it on top after mixing.  When you have a nice grouping of cracks on the top of your levain you are ready to mix the main dough.

Porridge Directions

Add about 3/4’s of the water called for in the porridge to the dry ingredients in a small pot set to low and stir constantly until all the water is absorbed.  Add the remainder of the water and keep stirring until you have a nice creamy and soft porridge.  Remove from the heat and let it come to room temperature before adding to the dough.  I put mine in the refrigerator and let it cool quicker.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours  and 550 grams of the beer for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  While the dough is resting stir in the onions with the remaining beer.  If you use fresh onions you can simply add it to the dough when going to the final mix step.  When the dough is rested, add the levain, cooled porridge,  salt and beer/onion mixture and mix on low for 6 minutes.     You should end up with a very sticky dough.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 1.5 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1 hours before refrigerating).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 30 minutes. Remove the dough and shape as desired. (Note: this is a very sticky dough, so use wet hands and your dough blade to help you shape the dough.  Do not deflate the dough and add a ton of flour or you will not be happy with the result).  I suggest using a basket with a liner floured with rice flour to prevent sticking.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it’s size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

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Rye Porridge Onion Bread

31 Jul

main  I was in the mood for a nice pastrami on rye with melted cheese and a good sour pickle.  I was going to just make my Jewish deli rye formula, but I remembered I had not made a rye porridge bread bread yet, so why not combine the two and hope for the best!

I have to say the taste on this one is fantastic and it’s one of those breads you can eat with nothing on it.  The high hydration and  porridge component made this breads crumb super moist.  I love the onion bits dispersed with the rolled oats, rye chops and cracked wheat.

The only issue I had with this bread was that it ended up a little flat with little oven spring.  The high % of rye in this one fermented real quick and I should have reduced the amount of time I left the dough out after bulk fermenting.  It was very difficult to shape and I made the mistake of not using a basket with a liner.  I managed to get some extra flour underneath the dough after I shaped and placed in the cane baskets but probably man-handled the dough a bit too much.  Next time I will use a lined basket(s) for sure or make batards and use my linen couche.

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Rye Porridge Bread (%)

Rye Porridge Bread (weights)

Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

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Levain Directions

If you have a rye starter you can simply refresh and use the correct amount in the final mix.  If not, mix all the levain ingredients for Build 1 together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  One trick you can use to see if the starter is ready for build 2 is to sprinkle some rye flour on-top and when it cracks you are ready to go.  If you have a proofer you can cut down the time by setting it to 78 degrees.  It usually takes me about 3-4 hours using the proofer.

When you are ready for Build 2, mix in the remaining ingredients and hold back some of the rye flour and sprinkle it on top after mixing.  When you have a nice grouping of cracks on the top of your levain you are ready to mix the main dough.

Porridge Directions

Add about 3/4’s of the water called for in the porridge to the dry ingredients in a small pot set to low and stir constantly until all the water is absorbed.  Add the remainder of the water and keep stirring until you have a nice creamy and soft porridge.  Remove from the heat and let it come to room temperature before adding to the dough.  I put mine in the refrigerator and let it cool quicker.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours  and 450 grams of the water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  While the dough is resting stir in the onions with the remaining water.  If you use fresh onions you can simply add it to the dough when going to the final mix step.  When the dough is rested, add the levain, cooled porridge,  salt and water/onion mixture and mix on low for 6 minutes.     You should end up with a very sticky dough.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 1.5 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1 hours before refrigerating).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 30 minutes. Remove the dough and shape as desired. (Note: this is a very sticky dough, so use wet hands and your dough blade to help you shape the dough.  Do not deflate the dough and add a ton of flour or you will not be happy with the result).  I suggest using a basket with a liner floured with rice flour to prevent sticking.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it’s size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

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Pumpernickel Bread-Yeasted Version

3 Sep

Final     My wife asked me to make a simple Pumpernickel bread to bring to my Nieces birthday party this past Saturday.  She wanted to stuff it with her Sour Cream Spinach Dip and I didn’t have a lot of time since she asked me Friday afternoon.

Stuffed

I decided to adapt a few recipes I found in some of my baking books and came up with a bread similar to what you would find in a bakery but without the rye starter typically used.  The final bread came out perfect for the dip and I made a second one for sandwiches.

The crumb was tight which is ideal for this type of bread.  You can taste the crushed caraway seeds and molasses in this one.

It worked real well for my dinner last night of pastrami with melted Munster cheese.

It was a busy weekend and I made some smoked wings with a spiced paste marinade and citrus balsamic glaze and caramelized smoked onions for a Labor Day party at our friends house.  Everyone seemed to enjoy them since there were none left at the end of the day.

Wings

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Formula

Pumpernickel Yeast Version (%)

Pumpernickel Yeast Version (weights)

Link to BreadStorm files.

Dahila

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Directions

Add dehydrated onions to water first.  Next mix all of the flours together in your mixing bowl along with the instant yeast and cocoa powder.  (Note: I used a double dark cocoa powder).

Next add in the water and mix for one minute until the ingredients come together.  Let the dough rest for 20 minutes and then add in the remainder of the ingredients.   (Note: I used my coffee grinder to crush the caraway seeds or you can use a mortar and pestle).  Mix on low for 5 minutes and speed number 2 for 1 minute.  Take the dough out of your mixing bowl and place in a slightly oiled container/rising bucket.  Do a few stretch and folds and place the dough in your refrigerator overnight.

The next day take the dough out of the refrigerator and let it come to room temperature for around 1 hour.  Shape it as desired and place in a basket or shape batards.  In the meantime warm your oven to the highest setting and prepare it for steam.  My oven goes up to 550 degrees F.

After approximately 1 hour the dough should have increased in size around 1/3 or so and pass the poke test.  Score as desired and place in your oven with steam.  Lower the oven after 1 minute to 450 degrees and bake until the internal temperature is 210 degrees which should take around 20-25 minutes.

Let the bread rest for at least 1.5 hours before diving in.

This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.