Tag Archives: beer

Purple Corn Sourdough Pretzel Rolls with Beer

6 Jul

I have not made pretzel rolls in a while and wanted to try a new version.  I added some fresh milled purple corn flour, and rye flour along with some maple syrup to add a little sweetness.  Beer certainly goes well with pretzels so adding it to the dough was a no-brainer.

They came out very nice and you can really taste the beer flavor.  They are a little more dense than ones made with only white flour but certainly are tasty!

Download BreadStorm Files here.

Caution:  When using the Lye make sure you wear gloves, long sleeves and protective eye gear. Also, never add Lye to hot water or it will bubble over and probably burn you.

For Lye Bath (3.5% Solution

2 Liters (1836 grams) of Cold water

70 grams Sodium Hydroxide Crystals

Make the Levain

Add your seed starter to the indicated amount of flour and water and mix until incorporated.  Cover and let sit out at room temperature of in your proofer until nice and bubbly around 6-10 hours depending on your temperature.  Use immediately or refrigerate for a few days until ready to mix the main dough.

Procedure

Add the diastatic malt powder to the beer and stir.  Add the flours in your mixing bowl and slowly add the beer mixture.  Mix for about 1 minute until combined.  Cut your starter in pieces and lay on top of the flour mixture and cover and let rest for 30 minutes to 1 hour so the flour can absorb the liquid.

Next add the salt and maple syrup and mix for 6 minutes on low.    Place the dough in a slightly oiled bowl and do a couple of stretch and folds.  Cover the bowl and let it rest for 10-15 minutes.  Do another stretch and fold in the bowl and let it rest another 10-15 minutes.  Do another stretch and fold and let the dough sit out in the covered bowl for another 1.5 hours.  Place the dough in the refrigerator until ready to bake the next day.

When ready to bake take the dough out and leave it covered in your bowl for 1 – 1.5 hours.  Next divide the dough into pieces that are 110 grams each or 155 grams for larger rolls .  Shape as rolls and place on a baking sheet and cover with either a moist towel or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.  Let it rest for around 60 minutes to about 1/2 proof.

While the rolls are proofing, fill a large stock pot with 2 liters of cold water.  Measure out the Lye and slowly add it to the cold water.  (DO NOT EVER ADD LYE TO HOT WATER).  Cover the pot and bring it to a rolling boil and then shut off the heat.

Pre-heat your oven to 435 degrees.  When the rolls are proofed sufficiently, prepare to dip them for about 15 seconds in the lye bath upside down.  Let them drain on a bakers rack over a cookie tray covered with a towel or parchment paper.  After draining for a minute you can transfer them to a cookie/baking sheet that has been sprayed with cooking spray.  You want to use a stainless steel cooking sheet as aluminum may react with the lye and peel.  Note: do not ever use parchment paper as the rolls will get stuck to the bottom.  I know this from experience and I had to cut off the bottoms of half the rolls I made.  I actually use my Silpat non-stick sheets which work like a charm.

When ready to bake, score each roll with an “X” on the middle and sprinkle with pretzel salt and your topping of choice (I used sesame seeds and cheese and some poppy seeds).  Make sure you use pretzel salt if you want authentic rolls.

Bake for about 15-20 minutes until they are golden brown and register about 200 F in the middle.  Let them cool on a bakers rack until you can’t wait any longer!

Note: you cannot store these in a plastic bag or covered really otherwise the salt will react with the moisture in the air and you will end up with soggy tops.  I place them in a paper bag and leave it open so the air circulates.

Enjoy!

Some more photos from the gardens this week.

   

 

 

 

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Rye Spelt Onion Cheese Beer Bread

10 Oct

This is the first bake since returning from my business trip to Germany.  I had a nice trip, but unfortunately as usual I brought back the “Black Death” with me and it took me a good week to start feeling normal again, not to mention adjust to the East Coast time zone.

My wife has been dying to try making yogurt in the Instant Pot so after she finally made enough yogurt to feed a small army I decided to make use of some of it in a bread.

Fall is upon us on the East Coast of New York….well it was around 75 degrees today, so maybe it doesn’t feel like it just yet.  Anyway, this bake is the perfect fall bread to have with some soup or as part of a nice sandwich.  No cheese needed as it is inside the bread!  I used a medium hard style cheese that doesn’t melt very much which is why you can see nice chunks of it in the bread.

I also added a nice helping of caramelized onions which seem to have melted into the final dough.  Next time I will add some to the outside of the bread to really taste the sweet onion flavor.

Beer added a nice complex flavor and went perfectly with the fresh milled rye and spelt flour.  This one is tasty and good enough to eat with nothing on it, but a little butter won’t hurt it either.

Formula

 

Download the BreadStorm File Here

 

Levain Directions

Mix all the Levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.

Either use in the main dough immediately or refrigerate for up to 1 day before using.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours, and beer together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 30 minutes to an hour.  Next add the salt, and starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), and  mix on low for 4 minutes.  Add the cheese and onions and mix for about 30 seconds.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1 hour.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.   Place your dough into your proofing basket(s) and cover with a moist tea towel or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.  The dough will take around 1.5 hours depending on your room temperature.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.  (Note: the fresh spelt and rye combo really ferments quickly so don’t let it go too long or you may end up with a pancake).

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 540 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 25-35 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

The crumb was perfect for this type of bread, with a fairly open crumb but too much so you can hold all those nice fillings in!

Rye Greek Yogurt Porridge Beer Bread

12 Jul

 

I love porridge breads.  They are so moist and flavorful I never tire of making or eating them.

I tried something a little different for this one by using Greek yogurt in place of part of the water in making the porridge.  I think it just added an extra layer of flavor and was worth trying.

I also used beer as part of the liquid in the main dough.  This one was extra hydrated and was a little challenging to shape the next day.  Next time I would shape it right out of the refrigerator instead of letting it sit out for an hour.

The final bread tasted and smelled fantastic.  It was extra moist and good enough to eat without anything on it.  The beer didn’t come through as much as I would have hoped since I didn’t use enough of it due to only having 1 left to use.  Next time I will use all beer instead of water.

I’ve included a bunch of photos from my garden which is in full bloom right now.  Hope you give this one a try and enjoy the flowers.

Download the BreadStorm file here.

 

Levain Directions

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my proofer set at 83 degrees and it took about 4 hours.  You can use it immediately in the final dough or let it sit in your refrigerator overnight.

Porridge Directions

Add about 3/4’s of the milk called for in the porridge to the dry ingredients in a small pot set to low and stir constantly until all the milk is absorbed.  Add the remainder of the milk and keep stirring until you have a nice creamy and soft porridge.    Remove from the heat and let it come to room temperature before adding to the dough.  I put mine in the refrigerator and let it cool quicker.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours, and the water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the levain, cooled porridge, and salt and mix on low for 5 minutes. Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it’s size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

Happy Holidays–SD German Pretzels and Porridge Rye Beer Bread

26 Dec

img_5810-1   I hope everyone is having a Merry Christmas and Happy Hanukah.

For Christmas Eve at our good friends I made some German style pretzel rolls which are always a big hit and went perfectly with the Saurerbraten that was served for dinner.  I also made some potato pancakes to bring as well which everyone seemed to like.

I also made a Porridge Rye with beer to bring to our friends for Christmas day.  They usually serve ham as the main course so this rye goes perfect.  Unfortunately our friends were struck with the stomach virus that’s been going around and we ended up making our own ham at home yesterday.

The starter with the onions really is very pungent,  but when everything comes together this one is moist and tasty and worth the effort.

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No Oven–Spelt Kamut Cream Cheese Onion Bread

20 Dec

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Note to self:  Don’t bake bread in your Weber Charcoal Grill when it’s 25 degrees outside!

In any case, I just couldn’t wait any longer to join the fun and bake my “NO OVEN” challenge bread.  Of course over this past weekend it was raining and snowing so I had to wait until Monday.  I was working from home for the day prepping for my colonoscopy the next day.  Well, it’s so much fun not being able to eat anything except broth and Jello for a day and a half, especially when ones wife has baked 500 Christmas cookies.  The smell of the baked/smoked bread was almost enough to drive me over the edge :0.

I used my Weber charcoal grill and added some Hickory wood chunks to get a nice smokey flavor and it really came through.  I set the 2 charcoal baskets on each side of the kettle so I could bake the bread on indirect heat.  The only issue I had was the parchment paper caught fire from the wood chunks flaming more than anticipated and burned the bottom of the loaves slightly.

I used an aluminum pan on the bottom of the grill and dumped in 1 1/2 cups of hot water to generate some steam.  I think in hindsight it could have used more steam and it would have helped if it wasn’t so cold outside since I was only able to get the grill up to 425 degrees briefly.  Usually I can easily get it to over 500 degrees.

All in all, when I was finally able to try a piece this afternoon after my procedure, the taste was amazing.  The smokey flavor is incredible and even the slightly charred bottom is not bad :).  The onion really shines in this one and the cream cheese really created a soft moist crumb.

The crumb could have been more open but I think my timing was off a little since I was working while trying to bake this as well and probably should have gotten it in the barbecue earlier.

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spelt-kamut-onion-cream-cheese-bread-weights

spelt-kamut-onion-cream-cheese-bread

Download the BreadStorm File Here.

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Levain Directions

Mix all the Levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I usually do this the night before.  Use immediately or refrigerate for up to 2 days.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours,  cracked wheat,  and 400 grams of the Ale together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 60 minutes or longer.  I actually left it for around 2.5 hours.  Next add the salt, starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), honey, cream cheese and balance of the Ale, and mix on low for 5 minutes.  Add the caramelized onions and mix until incorporated.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (If you have a proofer you can set it to 80 degrees and follow above steps but you should be finished in 1 hour to 1.5 hours).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.   Place your dough into your proofing basket(s) and cover with a moist tea towel or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.  The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

As I mentioned above I used my Weber charcoal kettle grill but you can also bake in your oven as well.

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Spelt Kamut Pale Ale Onion Bread

4 Dec

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After returning from my annual pilgrimage to North Carolina and finding my kitchen devoid of fresh bread I got busy milling some fresh flour.

I wanted to use a beer in this bake and decided that fresh spelt and Kamut would go great with the Pale Ale I had in stock.  Of course some caramelized onions would also go well with this combination and some Greek Yogurt and honey rounded out the flavor profile.

I added some smoked sesame seeds and garlic sesame seeds to the top and baked it boldly.

The flavor is nutty and bursting with sweetness from the onions and honey.  The crumb is moderate and not as open as I expected but ideal for sandwiches.

I am definitely going to bake this one again.

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spelt-kamut-onion-bread-weights

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Download the BreadStorm File Here.

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Levain Directions

Mix all the Levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I usually do this the night before.  Use immediately or refrigerate for up to 2 days.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours,  cracked wheat, Greek Yogurt and 400 grams of the Ale together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 60 minutes or longer.  I actually left it for around 2.5 hours.  Next add the salt, starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), honey, and balance of the Ale, and mix on low for 5 minutes.  Add the caramelized onions and mix until incorporated.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (If you have a proofer you can set it to 80 degrees and follow above steps but you should be finished in 1 hour to 1.5 hours).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.   Place your dough into your proofing basket(s) and cover with a moist tea towel or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.  The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 445 degrees.  Bake for 25-35 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 210 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

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Sprouted Rye with Onions & Beer

26 Feb

main  I made this loaf last week but didn’t have time to post it until now.  I made a similar bread over last summer which came out great and this version was even better.  The addition of the beer and rye chops really pushed this one over the top.  I also used some white rye flour which is traditional in this style of bread.  The caraway seeds were added to the main dough mix for added flavor.

The crumb was nice and moist and flavorful.  Just an ideal deli style bread better than anything you will ever buy from the super market bread aisle.

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Formula

Sprouted Rye Bread with Beer (%)

Sprouted Rye Bread with Beer (weights)

Download the BreadStorm File Here.

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Levain Directions

Build 1: Mix all the Levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.

Build 2: Add the flour and water as indicated and mix thoroughly.  Let it sit at room temperature for 7-8 hours plus or minus until starter has peaked.

Either use in the main dough immediately or refrigerate for up to 1 day before using.

 Main Dough Procedure

Rehydrate the onions in the water/beer mixture for a minute or two.  Next, mix the flours, rye chops, caraway seeds and water/onion mixture together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 20-30 minutes.  Next add the salt, starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), and mix on low for 6 minutes.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (If you have a proofer you can set it to 80 degrees and follow above steps but you should be finished in 1 hour to 1.5 hours).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.   Place your dough into your proofing basket(s) and cover with a moist tea towel or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.  The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 500 degrees and after another 3 minutes lower it to 450 degrees.  Bake for 25-35 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 210 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

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