Kamut-Fresh Milled Wheat Sourdough

30 Dec

Main  I received a Nutrimill for a present from my wife last week….another new toy to play with!  I’ve ground fresh flour in small batches in my coffee grinder, but it is no comparison to using the Nutrimill.  I have yet to purchase any drum sieves to sift the flour and I definitely want to buy some bulk grains as soon as I can find a good source.

For my first attempt I used whatever I had on-hand which was Kamut, Hard Red Whole Wheat and Hard White Whole Wheat.  I used the Kamut to make the levain and also made a scald with some of the white whole wheat.

I added the scald ingredients to the hydration calculations but I think I did something wrong as I’m coming up with a crazy number for the hydration with add-ins.  The potatoes were calculated at 81% water content which as something to do with it.  In any regards, the dough is a bit on the wet side but the fresh grains really soak up the water, so it’s not that hard to handle.

I added the potatoes which I had left-over from making potato pierogies over the holidays and it had cream cheese, butter and milk in them.  This was probably the best tasting pierogies filling I’ve made to date.

I also used some honey to try to cut some of the bitterness from the whole wheat and made the scald for the same reason.

All in all, for the first loaf made with my milled flour it was very good.  The loaf is very tasty with a moderately open crumb and a nice crust.  I sent one of these off to Arizona as a belated present to Max’s friend Lucy and DA.  I hope they enjoy it along with the Orange Shandy Durum Semolina bread.

Closup1

Formula

Kamut-Fresh-Milled-Wheat-SD

Closup2

Levain Directions

Mix all the Levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I usually do this the night before.

Either use in the main dough immediately or refrigerate for up to 1 day before using.

Scald Directions

Boil the water in a small sauce pan and add the flour.  Mix until you end up with a paste.  This should take only a minute or two and then you can remove from the heat and let it cool down before using in the main dough.

FreshMilled

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours, and water together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 20-30 minutes.  Next add the salt, starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), potatoes, and honey and mix on low for 3 minutes.  Mix on medium for another 3 minutes and then remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.  I made 1 large boule shape.   Place your dough into your proofing basket(s) and cover with a moist tea towel or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.  The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 500 degrees and after another 3 minutes lower it to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 210 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

CrumbCrumbClose

 

 
About these ads

4 Responses to “Kamut-Fresh Milled Wheat Sourdough”

  1. Karin Anderson January 2, 2014 at 11:23 am #

    Happy New Year, Ian!
    That was definitely a very useful gift (I made gifted myself a Nutrimill a year ago, when I got tired of hand-cranking grains for hours to produce a small amount of flour).
    I haven’t used large amounts of self-ground flours, yet, since I bake so much for sale, and go through bags of whole wheat, rye and spelt fast. I use it mainly for specialty flours, like Kamut, Farro or Barley.
    Though I usually cut down sweeteners in bread recipes, I find, too, that higher percent whole wheat breads need more honey or sugar than others, because of this slightly bitter or “too healthy” taste. Longer soaking or fermenting helps, though.
    I found some Leinenkugel Orange Shandy in our supermarket, and it’s waiting to be used!

    • mookielovesbread January 2, 2014 at 2:10 pm #

      Thanks Karin and Happy New Year to you as well.
      I hear you about only using the mill for specialty flours and that is most likely what I will end up doing. I have to buy a drum sieve next and find a good source for berries to buy.
      Let me know if you can help with either.
      I hope you enjoy the Orange Shandy bread and do let me know how it comes out.

      Regards,
      Ian

      • Karin Anderson January 2, 2014 at 8:52 pm #

        I get rye berries from my supplier Downeast Food Distributors, but the specialty grain berries are more iffy. Fortunately our local natural food store (the one that sells my bread) can order them for me (20 lb bags).
        If you have a natural food store in your vicinity that sells stuff in bulk (Whole Foods does, too) this would be probably your best bet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 298 other followers

%d bloggers like this: