7 Grain Double Starter Soaker Bread

9 Jun

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Well since the last few bakes have been very white I started to feel the Force draining and I was being pulled towards the Dark Side!  This bread is a 70% whole grain power-house made with a soaker which I scalded to make sure it was nice and soft.  I used 5 different whole grains in the scald and 3 whole grain flours plus some French style flour in the double starters and main dough.

I also wanted to try something a little fancy for the shaping and placed a small ball of dough along with a double braid in the bottom of my basket before placing the rest of the dough on top of both of them.  This formed a nice hat on top of the bread.

The soaker was brought up to a boil and scalded for about 10 minutes until all the grains were nice and soft and then put in a bowl and covered for 5-6 hours until the levains were ready to use.

The end result of this bake was a nice wholesome tasty bread. The crust was excellent and the crumb was soft and chewy chock full of grainy goodness.

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Levain Directions

Starter 1

Mix all the levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I usually do this the night before.

Starter 2

Mix all the ingredients listed with the levain from the first build and let it set at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled or before it starts collapsing on itself.  Either use right away in the main dough or refrigerate for 1 day.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours and the water except for around 75 grams, together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 30 minutes to 1 hour.  Next add the salt, starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), honey, and soaked grains and mix on low for a minute.  Add the rest of the water  unless the dough is way too wet.   Mix on low-speed for another 4 minutes.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  (I used my new proofer this time and it only took about 1 hour at 80 degrees).

Remove the dough and shape as desired.   Place your dough into your proofing basket(s) and cover with a moist tea towel or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.  The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  (Again, I used my proofer set at 80 degrees and let it rise for about 1.5 hours).

Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Risenin-basket

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 500 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

Scored

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  I baked for about 10 minutes at 450 and then lowered the oven to 435 since this is such a large loaf.  Bake for around 50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

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7 Responses to “7 Grain Double Starter Soaker Bread”

  1. Searching For Sugar Plums June 10, 2013 at 9:48 am #

    Your bread is outstanding! I love the variety of grains you have in there too, I always stick to plain old wheat and need to branch out more!

    • mookielovesbread June 10, 2013 at 2:38 pm #

      Thank you for your comment. Please use this recipe as inspiration to try some new grains. There are so many stores and internet sites where you can buy different grains and flours to try. I’m not sure where you live but if you are in the USA I can point you in the right direction.
      Regards,
      Ian

      • Searching For Sugar Plums June 10, 2013 at 3:16 pm #

        Thank you! I certainly will use this recipe as inspiration. I usually use just whole wheat flour for my bread, and have been so focused on all the different techniques and approaches to making bread that I’ve only just now felt ready to switch things up a bit and incorporate some new grains. I added a cup of mashed sweet potato to my last loaf which went pretty well but there is always so much to learn! I recently started buying fresh ground wheat from the farmer’s market which has a really nice taste. I also bought some rye and oats there but I don’t think he grew other grains. I am in Canada so we might have some of the same stores. I’ve seen various grains at the bulk barn before… I wouldn’t really know where else to look besides ordering online. What would you recommend I do? And thank you very much for such a nice reply!

        • mookielovesbread June 10, 2013 at 7:22 pm #

          I buy a lot of my flour from King Arthur Flour online but I think the shipping charges will be high to Canada. I also use Breadtopia.com which may be okay for shipping but not sure. If you Have a whole foods that might be worth checking out also.

          • Searching For Sugar Plums June 11, 2013 at 8:35 pm #

            Thanks for the tips! I’ll look into those places, and try to research some Canadian alternatives as well. I’m excited to try this out :)

  2. Karin Anderson June 11, 2013 at 9:05 am #

    Wow! That’s really “going to the dark side” with all these whole grains. That loaded loaf will definitely go on my to-do list!

    • mookielovesbread June 11, 2013 at 9:38 am #

      Thanks Karin.
      I hope you give this one a try and let me know what you think.
      Thanks again for your comments.
      Regards,
      Ian

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